Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Pandan Chiffon Cake



This is a fantastic chiffon cake recipe from Keiko Ishida’s baking book. The cake is very light and cottony soft, just how a perfect chiffon cake should be. I used Keiko’s Vanilla Chiffon cake recipe here; but, I substituted the water and vanilla with freshly squeezed Pandan juice (Screw pine leaves). The result? A wonderful fragrant Pandan Chiffon Cake which everyone loved very much. I am really pleased with this recipe. It's definitely a keeper, one to share with everyone!

NOTE: This is an updated post with a new video cooking guide. {Original post published on 03/29/11}




Pandan Chiffon Cake

Ingredients

6 Large Egg Yolks
25 g Sugar
70 g/ml Pandan Juice
1 tsp Pandan Paste, optional
70 g/ml Canola, Vegetable or Corn Oil
100 g Pastry Flour, sifted

Meringue
100 g Sugar
12 g Corn Flour/Starch
7 Large Egg Whites

Equipment: Angel Cake Tube Pan (22 or 24cm)
Baking Sheet

Note: Pandan Juice: Blend 18 to 20 Pandan leaves with 80 to 90ml of Water. Strain and discard the pulp.

Method

Position the rack on lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 325˚F/160˚C.

Place the egg yolks and sugar in a large bowl, and beat well. Add Pandan juice, oil, and Pandan paste, if using and stir to incorporate with a whisk. Add flour and mix well, until the batter becomes sticky.

Make the meringue: Combine sugar and corn flour. Beat the egg whites until foamy. Add half the sugar and continue beating for a few minutes, then add remaining sugar and beat until egg whites are glossy and stiff peaks form.

Add one-third of meringue into the egg yolk mixture and fold in lightly, then add remaining meringue and fold to incorporate completely.

Pour batter into an ungreased angel cake tube pan. Bake for 50 to 55 minutes.

When cake is done, remove from the oven and turn it over, leaving it to cool for about an hour.

Once the cake is cool completely, carefully run a knife or spatula around the sides of the cake to loosen it before inverting onto a wire rack.



32 comments :

  1. Thanks for this post. I had never heard of Pandan juice before ... what a great way to get a natural green color too! The cake looks lovely.

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  2. Great idea!Is that what gives your cake the green color? No artificial flavor or coloring? Awesome. Thanks for sharing the tips on DIY pandan juice.

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  3. Pandan is such a fun colour. I tasted a pandan cake for the first time at KK airport in Malaysia. It was a 7am breakfast choice and the only thing available since the kitchen wasn't open. It was surprisingly custardy inside. Your cake looks so lovely and soft. Perfect with a green tea for a semi-healthy afternoon snack.

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  4. It's a beautiful chiffon cake. Very natural colour too!

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  5. nice, did u try the black sesame one as well ?

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  6. can i use a normal cake pan if i don't have a tube pan?

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  7. Love pandan chiffon and haven't seen it in years -- thanks for sharing this!

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  8. Wow the texture of the cake looks really fine!

    May I know where you got the transparent cake stand from? It's absolutely lovely!

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  9. @Chris's Gourmet Fashion: You are welcome. Pandan leaves have a nice scent and often used in both savory and sweet dishes.

    @whisksandchopsticks : Yes, the Pandan leaves
    juices gave the cake its natural green color.

    @bunnyeatsdesign : You must have had the Pandan layer cake. Those are tasty too!

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  10. @busygran: Thanks.

    @Swee San: No, I have not tried yet. Your Black Sesame Chiffon Cake looks really good.

    @Anonymous: I have not tried baking chiffon cake in a regular pan. I supposed you could try, but the result might not be the same.

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  11. @manju: You are welcome.

    @Janine: The glass cake stand is available at Pier 1 Imports.

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  12. I grew up eating this cake. so light and fluffy. and the green color is my favorite part.

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  13. Hi Angie,

    This is Wai Bing...hope you still remember me :) I've always wanted to make pandan chiffon cake but don't have enough courage (heard that it's tricky to make). However, your pandan cake looks so yummy...I must give it a try! :) Do you know where I can find pandan paste in Vancouver?

    Regards,
    Wai Bing

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  14. @Wai Bing: Of course I remembered you! It's not that difficult to bake a chiffon cake, even I can do it ;-). You can purchase the Pandan paste at Wong Xin market.They are located at 747 Gore Ave in Chinatown. Hey, weather is great for a picnic. We should plan one.

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  15. Thanks for the words of encouragement, Angie! :) We'll check out Wong Xin next time we are in that area. Hopefully when we meet next, I've successfully attempted it! Picnic sounds good, better still if the weather is warmer. Any chance you're around during summer school holidays? If not, we'll work around your schedule and have one before you leave. We could discuss further via email. Let me know if you need me to send you one so that you have my email address.

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  16. Hi,

    Out of curiousity, if I cant find pandan leaves to make the pandan juice, is there a suitable substitute?

    Thank you.

    PS: the cake looks amazing!

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  17. @Anonymous: You can replace the juice with water, and mix in some Pandan paste, or water with Pandan essence with a little green food coloring.

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  18. 2 thumbs up for a great recipe. i've tried few recipe before.....using cream of tartar. it taste a lil' funny. glad i found this. my mom was SO happy.

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  19. Hi, I stumbled upon your pandan chiffon recipe. I'm just wondering if I can use coconut milk for the recipe - have you tried?

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  20. @WAHM:I added some coconut milk and reduced the corn oil once, but the cake turned out on a heavy side.

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  21. Thanks, Angie... I'll try out this one (without the coconut) and let you know the outcome!

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  22. I bumped into this recipe and tried it today. Instead of using pastry flour, I used plain one as this is what I have in my pantry. It turned out nice and soft. After cooling,the top part was a bit crusty and slightly sinked. Does it mean this way or did it bake it too long? Thanks for sharing the recipe.

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  23. @Anonymous: Thanks for trying out the recipe. I think it is normal to have a bit of crusty top, and the chiffon cake usually shrinks a little after cooling.

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  24. Can I use the Pandan juice you find frozen in a Filipino grocery? It comes in little packets or a frozen juice can here. Not sure where to find the Pandan paste in Medford, Oregon. But I would love to try this--looks and sounds lovely.

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  25. Hi, just out of curiosity when you say 50 g/ml water....is it 50 ml?

    I am going to try this soon, so it would be great if you could let me know soon.

    Thank you.

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  26. Hi Angie,

    You are the best. I just made the chiffon cake but strawberry flavoring. Its like eating a cloud. Super fluffy. Thank you and I will be referring you in my post :)

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  27. Hi Angie,
    May I know what kind of oven heat setting did u use? Top & Bottom heating, Fan-Forced all round or just bottom heating? I am just concern that the top may get burnt due to the long baking time.
    Also, approx how much is 12g of corn flour? Abt 1 tsp?

    Thanks in advance for your advice, thinking of giving this recipe a go this weekend! :)

    Lisa

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    Replies
    1. It's the bottom heating oven. 12g of corn flour=1.28 Tbsp

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    2. Thanks for your reply. Just hope my cake will turn out ok.. :)

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  28. Dear Angie,

    Thank you so much for your recipe! I've tried a few others out in the Internet, but your recipe yields the best result for me :)
    However, I do have a question. I substituted the pastry flour for self-raising flour instead (which may be a faux pas, what do you think?). The SR flour has given my cake good height, only to leave me with holes in the centre! I'm hoping it's not the SR flour that produces the holes (and illusion of a tall cake). A tall cake looks good, but upon cutting it is a bit of a letdown. Pastry flour didn't work for me in the past, and that's why I went with SR. I have the oven on at 160˚C - but mine is a fan-forced electric oven (with a heating element instead of raw flame). Would you have any clues as to the holes in the cake?

    Thanks so much for your help :)

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    Replies
    1. Hey pk, thanks for your support and I'm glad you like the recipes. I think the holes in the cake probably due to some air trapped in the batter. Try bang the pan on a flat surface a couple of times before baking. I hope this help.

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